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Intersections of ethnicity, gender and sexual identity. Case studies to investigate the culture of physics in Germany

This research project started in winter semester 2019/20 with the aim to
expand the research on the professional culture of physics by an
intersectional perspective and is carried out by Franziska Kaiser and
Andrea Bossmann. The project consists of two subprojects which are
combining approaches of higher education studies, gender, migration and
queer studies. Franziska Kaiser investigates discrimination in physics
based on the (assumed) ancestry/origin and focuses on the experiences of
female physicists who have a history of migration. Andrea Bossmann
investigates the experiences of queer physicists. Both are interviewing
physicists at universities and research institutes in Germany. The
interviewees' experiences will be the basis for an analysis of how
gender is created and performed within the culture of physics from a
differentiated point of view. So far these research perspectives have
not been considered much in the research on the professional culture of
physics in Germany. Additionally, the project aims to raise awareness
for the topics of inclusion and diversity in the physics community.

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This research project started in winter semester 2019/20 with the aim to
expand the research on the professional culture of physics by an
intersectional perspective and is carried out by Franziska Kaiser and
Andrea Bossmann. The project consists of two subprojects which are
combining approaches of higher education studies, gender, migration and
queer studies. Franziska Kaiser investigates discrimination in physics
based on the (assumed) ancestry/origin and focuses on the experiences of
female physicists who have a history of migration. Andrea Bossmann
investigates the experiences of queer physicists. Both are interviewing
physicists at universities and research institutes in Germany. The
interviewees' experiences will be the basis for an analysis of how
gender is created and performed within the culture of physics from a
differentiated point of view. So far these research perspectives have
not been considered much in the research on the professional culture of
physics in Germany. Additionally, the project aims to raise awareness
for the topics of inclusion and diversity in the physics community.